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The wider the aperture the shorter the depth of field will be in your
photograph (less ‘distance’ will be sharp). Referred to as a ‘Shallow Depth of
Field’.
The smaller the aperture the longer the depth of field will be in your
photograph (more ‘distance’ will be sharp). Referred to as a ‘long Depth of
Field’.
As you can see in this illustration a wide aperture of f2.8 will give a shallow
DOF, whereas a small aperture such as f16 will create a long DOF
 
One of things we do in our courses is set tasks to really help the knowledge sink in and here is no different.
Task 2 – Control the Depth of Field of an image using the Aperture
1. Put your camera on to a tripod and put it onto its 2 seconds timer or use a remote trigger. This will keep your camera nice and
still during the exposures.
2. Put your camera to its AV or A setting. This is your Aperture Priority setting.
3. Put your ISO on Auto.
4. Then place your camera at a tight angle next to a wall, fence or something with a lot of distance. It works best having a
repeating pattern like a brick wall of fence but it’s not essential. See the image below for an example.
5. Make sure your focus point is in the same place for each of the shots.
6. Then take several pictures going through the aperture stops as in the sequence above. Don’t worry if you don’t have all the
numbers in that sequence, just use the ones you have.
7. Compare the shots on a computer screen to see the difference in the depth of field.
Voila – you’ve just controlled DOF in photography using apertures!
To learn how to use your camera properly,.